Review: Everyone Knows your Mother is a Witch by Rivka Galchen

The unconventional approach to describing the legal battle, the juxtaposition of satirical characters against the cutting realism of the setting – this will definitely be a favourite book of 2021.

Review of Refuse: CanLit in Ruins

My tangling together of value and production, identity and respect paralleled a similar phenomenon in Canadian literature as a whole. Refuse has shown me what lurks behind the façade of my dream job.

Books for Canada: Truth, Solidarity, Hope

I don’t have answers to the whys or the hows. I’m not an expert in politics or social justice – I know books better than people. Writing is what I have to offer. In light of this, I’ve put together a list of books.

Review: Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

Gideon the Ninth mixes genres with glee. Its title character, a teenage girl trapped in indentured servitude on a dreary planet called the Ninth, is desperate to join the army (here called the “Cohort”). Harrow, her employer and the de facto ruler of the Ninth, is desperate to keep Gideon at her side, apparently out of sheer vindictiveness.

Review: The Voyage Out by Virginia Woolf

Anyone who has had to study classic literature knows which websites to consult for a summary of whatever book they’ve been assigned. For The Voyage Out, Virginia Woolf’s first published novel, this approach does no favours to either the reader or the text, turning the story into a random series of events concerning upper-middle classContinue reading “Review: The Voyage Out by Virginia Woolf”